Prev. 100Charade2 Charade (acted)1 Charas1 Charbocle1 Charbonnier1 Charcoal2Charcot’s disease1 Charen1 Charge4 Charge Current1 chargé d´affaires1 Charge. v.1 Chargeable1 Chargen1 Chargeouse1 Charging and DischargingLeyden Jars...1 Charging Curve1 Charing Cross1 Chariot-buzzing1 Charité1 Charitee1 Charites1 Chariȝ1 Charlemagne2 Charles Alan Fyffe1 Charles Babbage1 Charles Boyle1 Charles Burney1 Charles Butler1 Charles Churchill1 Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Co...1 Charles Cotton1 Charles Cowden Clarke1 Charles Darwin13 Charles Dibdin1 Charles Dickens5 Charles Duke Yonge1 Charles Edward Stuart1 Charles Ferdinand, Duke of Berry1 Charles Girdlestone1 Charles Haddon Spurgeon1 Charles Hanbury Williams1 Charles Hazlewood1 Charles Henry Pearson1 Charles Honeyman1 Charles I of England12 Charles II of England13 Charles James Fox2 Charles James Lever1 Charles James Napier1 Charles James Vaughan1 Charles John Ellicott1 Charles Johnstone1 Charles Kingsley2 Charles Knight1 Charles Lamb1 Charles Lamb Kenney1 Charles Leslie1 Charles Lever1 Charles Lloyd1 Charles Lock Eastlake1 Charles Lyell1 Charles Mackay1 Charles Macklin1 Charles Matthews1 Charles Merivale1 Charles Montagu, 1st Earl of Halifa...1 Charles Napier (Royal Navy officer)1 Charles Piazzi Smyth1 Charles Reade1 Charles Richardson1 Charles Robert Leslie1 Charles Robert Maturin1 Charles Rogers1 Charles Sackville, 6th Earl of Dors...1 Charles Shirley Brooks1 Charles Stuart Calverley1 Charles Swain1 Charles Tennyson Turner1 Charles Tennyson-Turner1 Charles Viner1 Charles Waterton1 Charles Wentworth Dilke1 Charles Wesley1 Charles Wolfe1 Charles Wordsworth1 Charles XII of Sweden1 Charley1 Charley Lancaster1 Charley Prescott1 Charley-pitcher1 Charlies1 Charlotte Brontë4 Charlotte Brooke1 Charlotte Eliza Lawson Riddell1 Charlotte Elizabeth Tonna1 Charlotte Lennox1 Charlotte Mary Yonge1 charlotte russe1 Charlotte Smith1 Prev. 100

Charcoal

 Charcoal Fumes

The usual remedies for persons overcome with the fumes of charcoal in a close apartment are, to throw cold water on the head, and to bleed immediately; also apply mustard or hartshorn to the soles of the feet. 
 Caution on Charcoal

Cooks should be cautioned against the use of charcoal in any quantity, except whore there is a free current of air ; for charcoal is highly prejudicial in a state of ignition, although it may be rendered even actively beneficial when boiled, as a small quantity of it, if boiled with meat on the turn , will effectually cure the unpleasant taint. 

An Ill-Fixed Blind No One Can Wind.