Devonshire Slang

7 terms

Cab

to stick together, to muck, or tumble up—Devonshire.
A brothel. Mother: how many tails have you in your cab? how many girls have you in your bawdy house?
in statutory language, “a hackney carriage drawn by one horse.” Abbreviated from the French  cabriolet ; originally meaning “a light low chaise.” The wags of Paris playing upon the word (quasi cabri  au lait) used to call a superior turn-out of the kind a cabri au crême. Our abbreviation, which certainly smacks of slang, has been stamped with the authority of the Legislature, and has been honoured by universal custom.

Colly-wobbles

the stomach-ache, a person's bowels,—supposed by many to be the seat of feeling and nutrition.—Devonshire.

Dowd

a woman's nightcap.—Devonshire : also an American term; possibly from dowdy , a slatternly woman.

Goosecap

A silly fellow or woman.
a simpleton, a booby, or noodle.—Devonshire.

Grubby

musty, or old-fashioned.—Devonshire.

Shackly

loose, rickety.—Devonshire.

Vinnied

mildewed, or sour.—Devonshire.