Housekeeping

 An Ever-dirty Hearth

An ever-dirty hearth, and a grate always choked with cinders and ashes, are infallible evidences of bad housekeeping. 


 Domestic Rules

Mrs Hamilton, in her "Cottagers of Glenburnie," gives three simple rules for the regulation of domestic affairs, which deserve to be remembered, and which would, if carried into practice, be the means of saving time, labour, and patience, and of making every house a "well-ordered" one. They are as follows:

  1. Do everything in its proper time.
  1. Keep everything to its proper use.
  1. Put everything in its proper place.



 A Hint on Household Management

Have you ever observed what a dislike servants have to anything cheap? They hate saving their master's money. I tried this experiment with great success the other day. Finding we consumed a vast deal of soap, I sat down in my thinking chair, and took the soap question into consideration, and I found reason to suspect we were using a very expensive article, where a much cheaper one would serve the purpose better. I ordered half a dozen pounds of both sorts, but took the precaution of changing the papers on which the prices were marked before giving them into the hands of Betty. "Well, Betty, which soap do you find washes best?" "Oh, please sir, the dearest, in the blue paper; it makes a lather as well again as the other." "Well, Betty, you shall always have it then;" and thus the unsuspecting Betty saved me some pounds a year, and washed the clothes better—Rev. Sydney Smith

Bottles of Brandy are Followed by Bottles of Physic.