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Joey

a fourpenny piece. The term is derived (like Bobby  from Sir Robert Peel) from Joseph Hume. The explanation is thus given in Hawkins's History of the Silver Coinage of England :—

“These pieces are said to have owed their existence to the pressing instance of Mr. Hume, from whence they, for some time, bore the nickname of Joeys. As they were very convenient to pay short cab fares, the hon. M.P. was extremely unpopular with the drivers, who frequently received only a groat where otherwise they would have received a sixpence without any demand for change.”

The term, therefore, was originated by the London cabmen, who have invented many other popular phrases. Fancy offering a modern hansom cabman a Joey !