Numeration

Numeration teaches the different value of figures by their different places  (see Walkinghame, Court Guide, Law List, &c.); also the value of ciphers, or noughts, according to their relative situations (see Intellectual Calculator, or Martin's Arithmetical Frames). As regards the value of figures in places, we have illustrations in sinecures of all grades, from the Lords of the Treasury to the meanest underling of the Stamp-Office.

Place and pension make the unit  a multitude , according to the position of the noughts,—that is, that large portion of the public called the nobodies. The more a man is surrounded by his inferiors, the greater he becomes. Hence the necessity of restrictive tariffs to prevent wealth in a community,—and of impediments to education. It is not, therefore, naughty  for our betters to keep us down by any kind of mystification; as the sun always looks larger through a fog.

The value of figures and of ciphers will be well understood in the following table, which ought to be committed faithfully to memory. It will be seen that when the noughts, the nobodies, that is, the people, go before the legislative units, their value is consequently decreased; but when they follow as good backers in good measures, the value of the characters is increased ad infinitum.

Table I.—"Legislation Behind the People."

The good old times.
P
E
O
P
L
E
.
 1 King.
 20 Lords.
 300 Tithe-eaters.
 4000 Quarrel-mongers (lawyers).
 50000 Men-killers (army).
 600000 Land-swallowers (landlords).
 7000000 Dividendists.
 80000000 Pensioners.
 900000000 Sinecurists.

Table II.—Legislation in Advance of the People

The new system, or march of intellect.
King 100000000  P
E
O
P
L
E
.
Lords 20000000  
Tithe-eaters 3000000  
Quarrel-mongers 400000  
Land-swallowers 50000  
Dividendists 6000  
Men-killers 700  
Pensioners 80  
Sinecurists 9