Prev. 100Simple Magnet1 Simple Substitution1 Simples1 Simpleton1 Simpson1 Sims-Edison Torpedo1Sin2 Sinbad the Sailor1 Since1 Sindbad the Sailor1 Sinden1 Sine Curve1 Sine die1 Sine Galvanometer1 Sine invidia1 Sine Law1 Sine odio1 Sine qua non1 Sinegen1 Sinen1 Sing1 Sing out1 Sing Sing2 Sing small2 Sing.1 Singe1 Single Coil Dynamo1 Single Curb Working1 Single Fluid Theory1 Single Fluid Voltaic Cell1 Single Needle Telegraph1 Single Peeper1 Singleton2 Sing-song1 Sinistrotorsal. adj.1 Sink down1 Sinkers1 Sinks1 Sinne1 Sinon2 Sinuous Current1 Sinus2 Siouns1 Sipes1 Siphon Recorder1 Si-quar1 Sir Andrew Freeport1 Sir Anthony Absolute1 Sir Archibald Alison1 Sir Aubrey de Vere, 2nd Baronet1 Sir Cauline1 Sir Charles Dilke, 2nd Baronet1 Sir Charles Grandison1 Sir Charles Sedley, 5th Baronet1 Sir David Brewster1 Sir David Dunder1 Sir Dayonet1 Sir Ector1 Sir Edward1 Sir Ezzelin1 Sir Frederick Eden, 2nd Baronet1 Sir Fyrapel1 Sir Galahad1 Sir George Cornewall Lewis, 2nd Bar...1 Sir Geraint1 Sir Gibbie1 Sir Gobble1 Sir Guy, Earl of Warwick1 Sir Harry1 Sir Henry Rawlinson, 1st Baronet1 Sir Hugh Evans 1 Sir James Tennent1 Sir John1 Sir John Barleycorn1 Sir John Beaumont1 Sir John Bowring1 Sir John Fitz1 Sir Joseph Banks1 Sir “judas” Stukeley1 Sir Lancelot Threlkeld1 Sir Launfal1 Sir Leicester Dedlock1 Sir Loin1 Sir Michael Scott1 Sir Nathaniel Wraxall, 1st Baronet1 Sir Peter Teazle1 Sir Ralph Abercromby1 Sir Reverence2 Sir Richard Blackmore1 Sir Richard Fanshawe, 1st Baronet1 Sir Robert Ayton1 Sir Robert Cotton, 1st Baronet, of ...1 Sir Robert Hazlewood1 Sir Roger de Coverley1 Sir Samuel Egerton Brydges1 Sir Samuel White Baker1 Sir Satyrane1 Sir Thomas Browne1 Sir Thopas1 Sir Timothy1 Prev. 100

Sims-Edison Torpedo

A torpedo driven by an electric motor, and also steered by electricity. Its motions are all controlled from the shore. The torpedo proper is carried some distance below the surface of the water by a vessel immediately above it, from which it is suspended by two rigid bars. In the torpedo is a cable reel on which the conducting cable is disposed. An electric motor and controlling gear are also contained within the torpedo. In its front the explosive is placed. It is driven by a screw propeller actuated by the electric motor. As it moves it pays out cable so that it has no cable to draw after it through the water, the cable lying stationary in the water behind it. This avoids frictional resistance to its motion. The maintenance of the torpedo at a proper depth is one of the advantages of the system.