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Single Fluid Theory

A theory of electricity. Electricity, as has been said, being conveniently treated as a fluid or fluids, the single fluid theory attributes electrical phenomena to the presence or absence of a single fluid. The fluid repels itself but attracts matter; an excess creates positive, a deficiency, negative electrification; friction, contact action or other generating cause altering the distribution creates potential difference or electrification. The assumed direction (see Direction) of the current and of lines of force are based on the single fluid theory. Like the double fluid theory, q. v., it is merely a convenience and not the expression of a truth. (See Fluid, Electric, and Double Fluid Theory)

Synonym: Franklin's Theory.