Spelling

 Hints upon Spelling

The following rules will be found of great assistance in writing, because they relate to a class of words about the spelling of which doubt and hesitation are frequently felt:

  1. All words of one syllable ending in l, with a single vowel before it, have double l  at the close; as, millsell.

  1. All words of one syllable ending in l, with a double vowel before it, have one l  only at the close: as, mailsail.

  1. Words of one syllable ending in l, when compounded, retain but one l  each; as, fulfilskilful.

  1. Words of more than one syllable ending in l  have one l  only at the close; as, delightfulfaithful ; except befalldownfallrecall,unwell, &c.

  1. All derivatives from words ending in l  have one l  only; as, equality, from equal fulness, from full ; except they end in er  or ly ; as, millmiller fullfully.

  1. All participles in ing  from verbs ending in e  lose the e  final; as have, having; amuse, amusing; unless they come from verbs ending in double e, and then they retain, both; as, see, seeing; agree, agreeing.

  1. All adverbs in ly  and nouns in ment  retain the e  final of the primitives; as, brave, bravely; refine, refinement; except acknowledgment, judgment, &c.

  1. All derivatives from words ending in er  retain the e  before the r; as, refer, reference; except hindrance, from hinder; remembrance  from remember; disastrous  from disaster; monstrous  from monster; wondrous  from wonder; cumbrous  from cumber, &c.

  1. Compound words, if both end not in i, retain their primitive parts entire; as, millstone, changeable, graceless; except always, also, deplorable, although, almost, admirable, &c.

  1. All words of one syllable ending in a consonant, with a single vowel before it, double that consonant in derivatives; as, sin, sinner; ship, shipping; big, bigger; glad, gladder, &c.

  1. Words of one syllable ending in a consonant, with a double vowel before it, do not double the consonant in derivatives: as,sleep, sleepy; troop, troopers.

  1. All words of more than one syllable ending in a single consonant, preceded by a single vowel, and accented on the last syllable, double that consonant in derivatives; as, commit, committee; compel, compelled; appal, appalling; distil, distiller.

  1. Nouns of one syllable ending in y  preceded by a consonant, change y  into ies  in the plural; and verbs ending in y, preceded by a consonant, change y  into ies  in the third person singular of the present tense, and into ied  in the past tense and past participle, as, fly, flies; I apply, he applies; we reply, we replied, or have replied. If the y  be preceded by a vowel, this rule is not applicable; as key, keys; I play, he plays; we have enjoyed  ourselves.

  1. Compound words whose primitives end in y  change y  into i ; as, beauty, Beautiful; lovely, loveliness.