Prev. 100The Farmer and His Sons5 The Farmer and the Cranes3 The Farmer and the Fox2 The Farmer and the Landlord1 The Farmer and the Snake2 The Farmer and the Stork4The Farmer and the Viper1 The Farmer, His Boy, and the Rooks1 The Farmer’s Treasure1 The Farmyard Cock and the Weatherco...2 The Farm-Yard Cock and the Weather-...1 The Fat Boy1 The Fatal Marriage2 The Father and His Daughters1 The Father and his Sons2 The Father and His Two Daughters2 The Fawn and his Mother3 The Fellow-Traveler1 The Fig Tree and the Flowering Shru...1 The Fighting Bulls and the Frog1 The Fighting Cocks and the Eagle3 The Fir and the Bramble1 The Fir Tree3 The Fir Tree and the Bramble1 The Fir Tree and the Thorn1 The First Snow-Storm1 The Fir-Tree and the Bramble2 The Fisher1 The Fisher and the Little Fish1 The Fisherman and His Nets1 The Fisherman and the Fish1 The Fisherman and the Little Fish4 The Fisherman and the Sprat1 The Fisherman Piping3 The Fishermen1 The Fishpond of St. Francis1 The Flax2 The Flea and the Man2 The Flea and the Ox2 The Flea and the Wrestler1 The Flies and the Honey2 The Flies and the Honey-Pot1 The Fly and the Draught-Mule2 The Fly and the Horse1 The Flying Trunk2 The Fool and the Baron1 The Foolish Pug1 The Foolish Woman1 The Forest and the Woodman1 The Forester and the Lion1 The Four Oxen and the Lion1 The Fowler and the Lark1 The Fowler and the Ring-Dove1 The Fowler and the Ringdove1 The Fowler and the Viper1 The Fowler, the Partridge, and the ...1 The Fox and the Ape1 The Fox and the Bramble2 The Fox and the Cat1 The Fox and the Crab1 The Fox and the Crane3 The Fox and the Crow9 The Fox and the Goat6 The Fox and the Grapes8 The Fox and the Grasshopper1 The Fox and the Hedgehog4 The Fox and the Leopard4 The Fox and the Lion8 The Fox and the Mask4 The Fox and the Monkey5 The Fox and the Mosquitoes2 The Fox and the Pheasants1 The Fox and the Sick Lion1 The Fox and the Snake1 The Fox and the Stork6 The Fox and the Tiger2 The Fox and the Turkeys1 The Fox and the Vizor Mask1 The Fox and the Wolf1 The Fox and the Wood-Cutter1 The Fox and the Woodcutter1 The Fox in the Well1 The Fox who had Lost his Tail2 The Fox Who Served a Lion1 The Fox Without a Tail7 The Fox, the Cock, and the Dog1 The Foxes and the River1 The Frightened Lion1 The Frog and the Bull1 The Frog and the Fox2 The Frog and the Mouse1 The Frog and the Rat1 The Frogs and the Bull1 The Frogs and the Fighting Bulls1 The Frogs and the Ox1 The Frogs and the Well1 The Frogs Asking for a King3 The Frogs’ Complaint Against the Su...2 The Frogs Desiring a King4 The Frogs Who Wished for a King1 Prev. 100

The Farmer and the Stork



The Farmer and the Stork


A Farmer set some traps in a field which he had lately sown with corn, in order to catch the cranes which came to pick up the seed. When he returned to look at his traps he found several cranes caught, and among them a Stork, which begged to be let go, and said, "You ought not to kill me: I am not a crane, but a Stork, as you can easily see by my feathers, and I am the most honest and harmless of birds." But the Farmer replied, "It's nothing to me what you are: I find you among these cranes, who ruin my crops, and, like them, you shall suffer."

If you choose bad companions no one will believe that you are anything but bad yourself.




The Farmer and the Stork

A FARMER placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which came to pick up his seed. With them he trapped a Stork that had fractured his leg in the net and was earnestly beseeching the Farmer to spare his life. "Pray save me, Master," he said, "and let me go free this once. My broken limb should excite your pity. Besides, I am no Crane, I am a Stork, a bird of excellent character; and see how I love and slave for my father and mother. Look too, at my feathers—they are not the least like those of a Crane." The Farmer laughed aloud and said, "It may be all as you say, I only know this: I have taken you with these robbers, the Cranes, and you must die in their company."

Birds of a feather flock together.

The Farmer and the Stork

THE FARMER AND THE STORK

A Stork of a very simple and trusting nature had been asked by a gay party of Cranes to visit a field that had been newly planted. But the party ended dismally with all the birds entangled in the meshes of the Farmer's net.

The Stork begged the Farmer to spare him.

"Please let me go," he pleaded. "I belong to the Stork family who you know are honest and birds of good character. Besides, I did not know the Cranes were going to steal."

"You may be a very good bird," answered the Farmer, "but I caught you with the thieving Cranes and you will have to share the same punishment with them."

You are judged by the company you keep.

The Farmer and the Stork

A Farmer placed his nets on his newly sown plough lands, and caught a quantity of Cranes, which came to pick up his seed. With them he trapped a Stork also. The Stork, having his leg fractured by the net, earnestly besought the Farmer to spare his life. "Pray, save me, Master," he said, "and let me go free this once. My broken limb should excite your pity. Besides, I am no Crane, I am a Stork, a bird of excellent character; and see how I love and slave for my father and mother. Look too at my feathers, they are not the least like to those of a Crane." The Farmer laughed aloud, and said: "It may be all as you say; I only know this, I have taken you with these robbers, the Cranes, and you must die in their company."

Birds of a feather flock together.